Cinematic Interventions to Freeing Palestine & The Global South Symposium
Part I
Watch the Symposium

NO EVIL EYE CINEMA Presents: Cinematic Interventions to Freeing Palestine and the Global South Symposium is aimed at decolonizing film in real time and curating a virtual environment with dedicated cinephiles that indict the cinematic status quo and build towards a radical future.

To FREE PALESTINE is to FREE CONGO, FREE SUDAN, FREE TIGRAY, FREE HAWAII, FREE PUERTO RICO & all oppressed & occupied peoples everywhere.

We invite you to join us for this day-long symposium which will host a series of conversations, lectures, workshops, and readings with trailblazing cinematic visionaries on how we define our histories and interventions.

NEEC VIRTUAL COMMUNITY GUIDELINES

NEEC VIRTUAL COMMUNITY GUIDELINES

This space is for people who believe in freedom for all occupied and oppressed peoples worldwide. If you don’t get it, get lost! 

PROVIDE GRACE 

Operate on the basis of respect and good faith. Please conduct all manners of discourse and sharing on the foundation of grace and care. By attending this session, you hereby agree to uphold these community guidelines throughout this virtual symposium. 

SAFETY & CONFIDENTIALITY

The safety and comfort of our attendees is important. This session will be recorded and will be made available on Youtube/ our website in the spirit of accessibility. Should you speak up or turn on your camera to engage in the dialogue, please understand your likeness will be recorded. We will be checking in on how folks are doing in the space and you are encouraged to reach out to Sonia if you encounter any uncomfortable or unsafe situations and/or interactions. We have the right to remove you from the webinar at any time should you not abide by our guidelines. 

RESPECT [NO ZIONISM + NO HECKLING] 

We are gathering with people from varying backgrounds with a range of racial identities, language accessibilities, gender identities, professions, age, and knowledge but under the united pursuit of liberation and democratizing cultural solidarity.

With that understanding, we must actively and intentionally cultivate a space in which each and everyone of us feels comfortable and knows that their peers respect them. We will not tolerate disrespect in the form of (but not limited to):

  • Deliberately not following guidelines.
  • Promoting, spreading, uploading Zionist rhetoric, propaganda, dog whistles, etc. 
  • Ignoring pronouns or misgendering someone (without appropriate correction).
  • Giving non-constructive criticism
  • Anger-based and competitive-based debate.
  • Glossing over someone’s experiences.
  • Mansplaining.
  • Inappropriate and uncomfortable comments.
  • Undermining folks and their ideas.
  • Abusive behavior (whether orally or in writing)
  • Classist, homophobic, transphobic, racist, and ableist behaviors, comments, and ideas.
SYLLABUS
We gathered resources, readings, movies on Palestine and cinema, history, and Afro-Palestine — including all links mentioned during the Symposium
Community Notes Resources
We asked attendees to take notes during the symposium in efforts to collectivizing our findings & notes & make them accessible. Parse through the notes as you watch the symposium recording!

SYMPOSIUM STATEMENT

We are currently witnessing a centennial-long campaign of empirical visual violence that has dehumanized a people to a degree where livestreaming an ethnic cleansing has been rendered acceptable. The process of detangling our current moment means confronting the multiplicity of cinema’s legacies ––– the camera as a tool of empirical propaganda and a tool of emancipation.

We understand the preciousness of operating behind the lens and the precarity of what our gaze can do to a people but what is our role and responsibility in this moment as film workers?

We must interrogate how the moving image has assisted in the proliferation of Orientalism and Islamophobia and has legitimized the horrors we currently see unfolding in Gaza where pro-Palestinian rallying cries can render an artist blacklisted.

We must learn the historical practices of colonial powers’ efforts in rendering cultural art production obsolete from oppressed artists & filmmakers whose efforts are to render their realities, culture, and history through visual modes of expression, understanding and legacy.

From this, we can begin to map our roles as carvers & preservationists of our product: the image, a film, a story that is rooted in an individual and collective reality of our conditions and our future.

As film workers and visual media practitioners, we must ask ourselves how we allow our tool to produce, project, and promote prejudice without our united dissent? As film workers, what are our collective demands and solutions moving forward?

Ruun Nuur and Ingrid Raphaël, NO EVIL EYE CINEMA Co-Founders & Symposium Curators

Symposium Schedule

Sun. Dec. 17 // 11:05a EST

Opening Statements

Virtual

with NO EVIL EYE CINEMA co-founders, Ruun Nuur and Ingrid Raphaël

RUUN NUUR

Writer, Documentarian

RUUN NUUR is an independent cinematic practitioner and cultural worker hyper focused on Muslim and African narratives. 

Producer of the Field of Vision commissioned documentary short, They Won’t Call It Murder (2022), a poetic exploration of Columbus, Ohio as a container of violence perpetrated by the local police force. The film was selected as a Vimeo Staff Pick and played at Sheffield Doc/Fest, BAMcinemafest, Camden International Film Festival, AFI Festival, DOCNYC and more.

As the co-founder of the nomadic microcinema, NO EVIL EYE CINEMA, Nuur has organized accessible education workshops and original film curation around the country and online. At 22, she created SVLLY(wood), an independent feminist print film magazine, one of the only kinds in the world.

She’s served on the juries of Sheffield Doc/Fest, Indie Memphis and has been an invited guest speaker for Doha Film Institute, True/False Film Festival, New York Film Festival, and many more. 

Her essays and interviews have been published in Film Comment, i-D, DAZED, Hyperallergic and among other multimedia platforms. Her work has been profiled in Interview Magazine, NYLON, Brooklyn Rail, and more. 

Nuur has been awarded as the Fall 2021 Film/Video Studio Resident at Wexner Center for the Arts and currently the 2022 Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship, working on a documentary feature on her homeland of Somalia.

INGRID RAPHAËL

Filmmaker, Artist, Educator, World-Builder

Ingrid Raphaël (they/them) is a multi-disciplinary artist, film director and educator. They draw from their nomadic migrations as an immigrant, a commuter, and daydreamer to weave and situate poetic metaphors between the personal & nature; against the backdrop of mapping spatiality.

They started their film career with personal video essays like movingbodyofwork and An Ode to Cbus, Ohio which screened at CineSpeak, and Anthology Film Archives. They later made their festival debut as the co-director of the Field of Vision commissioned award-winning documentary short, They Won’t Call It Murder (2022), a poetic exploration of Columbus, Ohio as a container of violence perpetrated by the local police force.

They are currently developing a speculative narrative – the project has received support from the Center for the Afrofuturist Studies and the Independence Public Media Foundation.

As the co-founder of the nomadic microcinema, NO EVIL EYE CINEMA (NEEC), Raphaël has organized accessible educational workshops and original film curation around the country and online. They also co-design FILM FUTURA, the decolonial satellite film school which has attracted over 400 students worldwide, and taught the course Afro-futurism on Screen where they continue to carve an intentional research practice of techniques used by Black filmmakers in non-linear modes of storytelling.

They currently teach Experimental Filmmaking at the university-level and Cinematography courses for indie community media enthusiasts and independent workshops through their creative atelier, ATË.

Sun. Dec. 17 // 11:15a EST

Tracing Palestinian Representation On Screen: From Orientatlism Towards A Militant Counter-Image

Virtual

LECTURE by Dareen Hussein followed by Q+A

DAREEN HUSSEIN

Writer, Programmer, Researcher

Dareen Hussein is a writer, programmer, and PhD candidate in History of Art at Ohio State University. Her research centers on anti-colonial cinemas of the Global South, with particular interest in Arab women’s cinema and contemporary art. Her intellectual practice is informed by her lived experience as a third generation Palestinian in exile.

Sun. Dec. 17 // 12:15p EST

On Censorship: Conversation on the Responsibility of Film & Cultural Institutions

Virtual

ROUNDTABLE with Jemma Desai, An Duplan, Saeed Taji Farouky, Nehad Khader and Miko Revereza. Q+A moderated by Ruun Nuur

JEMMA DESAI

Cultural Worker, Somatic Facilitator

Jemma Desai is a cultural worker and somatic facilitator whose work spans artistic and administrative practice, writing, curation, performance and other forms of articulation. In her work she is (re)searching new ways to make and circulate outside and inside cultural production, with and against institutions in order to question the role of testimony, desire and political commitment in the social relations that make cultural work. Interested in questions of care and form in the making, circulating and administering of artistic practices, she is committed to considering how form can be taken seriously beyond aesthetics, to transmute standard bureaucratic processes beyond reformist change, informing abolitionist practices of freedom and solidarity. A constant in her work has been an interest in the epistolary; the intimacy it invites and the desires it protects and reveals. This has produced a soma of itinerant criticism which she calls ‘critical yearning.’ Working through, or close to the body, it encompasses first person writing and performance, as well as material practice to form an embodied archive of desires for institutional recognition or change.

AN DUPLAN

Poet, Curator, Artist

Anaïs Duplan is a trans* poet, curator, and artist. He is the author of I NEED MUSIC (Action Books, 2021), a book of essays, Blackspace: On the Poetics of an Afrofuture (Black Ocean, 2020), a full-length poetry collection, Take This Stallion (Brooklyn Arts Press, 2016), and a chapbook, Mount Carmel and the Blood of Parnassus (Monster House Press, 2017). He is a professor of postcolonial literature at Bennington College, and has taught poetry at The New School, Columbia University, and Sarah Lawrence College, amongst others. As an independent curator, he has facilitated curatorial projects in Chicago, Boston, Santa Fe, and Reykjavík. He was a 2017-2019 joint Public Programs fellow at the Museum of Modern Art and the Studio Museum in Harlem, and in 2021 received a Marian Goodman fellowship from Independent Curators International for his research on Black experimental documentary. He is the recipient of the 2021 QUEER|ART|PRIZE for Recent Work, and a 2022 Whiting Award in Nonfiction. He was also awarded a Black Visionaries Award by Instagram and the Brooklyn Museum in 2022. In 2016, Duplan founded the Center for Afrofuturist Studies, an artist residency program for artists of color, based at Iowa City’s artist-run organization Public Space One.

SAEED TAJI FAROUKY

Filmmaker, Writer, Curator, Educator

Saeed Taji Farouky is a Palestinian-Egyptian-British filmmaker, writer, curator, and educator who has been making work around themes of conflict, human rights, and colonialism since 2004. His 2021 documentary, A Thousand Fires premiered as the opening film of Locarno’s Critics’ Week where it won the Marco Zucchi Prize for most innovative documentary. His previous feature documentary Tell Spring Not to Come This Year premiered at Berlinale 2015 where it won the Audience Award Panorama and Amnesty International Human Rights award. He regularly teaches and lectures at venues including University College London, National Film and Television School, Scottish Documentary Institute, Sensory Ethnography Lab (Harvard University) and Maysles Documentary Centre (New York). He is the designer and lead tutor of the Radical Film School, a free film course supporting people from backgrounds underrepresented in the industry, and co-founder of Safar, the UK’s only film festival dedicated entirely to Arab cinema.

NEHAD KHADER

Curator, Programmer, Editor

Nehad Khader is Festival Director at BlackStar Projects. Trained in media and literature by Black and Palestinian creators, Nehad curated her first exhibit at the Philadelphia Folklore Project in 2009, showcasing the works and oral histories of Palestinian women in Philadelphia. While in grad school, she worked on the Palestine Poster Project Archive as a curator, translator, and poster collector. She then served as Managing Editor of the peer-reviewed Journal of Palestine Studies. She’s been programming at BlackStar since 2015, but was a volunteer since its inception. A polyglot, Nehad speaks four languages and is enthusiastically learning ASL.

MIKO REVEREZA

Filmmaker

Miko Revereza (b. 1988. Manila) is a filmmaker living in Oaxaca, Mexico. His upbringing as an undocumented immigrant and current exile from the United States informs a relationship towards moving images. Revereza’s titles include DROGA! (8min, 2014), Disintegration 93-96 (5min, 2017), No Data Plan (70min, 2017), Distancing (10min, 2019), El Lado Quieto (70min, 2021), and Nowhere Near (96min, 2023). These works have been widely screened at festivals and institutions such as Locarno Film Festival, TIFF, NYFF, the Flaherty Seminar, the Smithsonian Institute and National Gallery of Art. His debut feature film, No Data Plan is recognized with such honors as the Sheffield Doc Fest Art Award and San Diego Asian Film Festival Emerging Filmmaker Award, as well as being listed in BFI Sight & Sound Magazine’s 50 Best Films of 2019, Hyperallergic’s Top 12 Documentary and Experimental Films of 2019 and CNN Philippines Best Filipino Films of 2019. Revereza was Filmmaker Magazine’s 2018 25 New Faces of Independent Cinema, a 2019 Flaherty Seminar featured filmmaker, recipient of the 2021 Vilcek Prize in Filmmaking, and holds an MFA from Bard College.

20 MIN BREAK // 1:45p EST

Sun. Dec. 17 // 2:05p EST

Resistance & The Role of Modern Film Workers from Tigray, Haïti & Puerto Rico

Virtual

READING & ROUNDTABLE with Film Futura Alumni Nala Haileselassie, Akua ‘River’ Moon and Carlos Mario. Moderated by Ingrid Raphaël

NALA HAILESELASSIE

Multidisciplinary Artist, Researcher, Curator

nala haileselassie is a multidisciplinary artist from tkaronto completing her bfa in film studies at toronto met university. working from the lineage of black feminist film and experimental documentary, her research is focused on cultural and collective memory, and the relation between the two as a child of migrants. nala looks to rework narratives surrounding diasporic identities through complicating personal archival materials.

AKUA RIVER MOON

Cultural Worker, Multimedia Storyteller

Aqua (or River) is a multimedia storyteller, cultural worker, elemental, friend, budding herbalist and NADA acupuncturist. Born in Quebec, Canada and raised between Paris, France, San Jose, California and Central Florida, River is a queer nonbinary trans third of African Ayitian, Taino/Arawakan & Italian descent, currently residing between Occupied Tequesta, Taino, and Seminole Lands (South Florida/Miami, USA), Occupied Lenapehoking land (Brooklyn, NY, USA). Through the mediums of sound, photography, filmmaking, along with other forms of cultural work, River explores stories of Black & Indigenous, Queer and Trans technology, communal and interpersonal storytelling, love, home, spirituality, longing, and transformation. Their work explores the archive as a ritual of home making and world weaving; exploring themes of belonging, transition, migration, becoming, Afro Diasporic blues, speculative fiction/reality, surrealism, documentation, liberation, decolonization, transformation and reckoning by way of the collective and personal body. River received a Bachelors of Fine Arts in Photography & Multimedia Art from Florida International University in 2016 in Miami, Florida. “the role of the artist is to make the revolution irresistible” – Toni Cade Bambarra

CARLOS MARIO

Filmmaker, Editor, Composer, Musician

Carlos Mario is a filmmaker, editor, composer and musician born and raised in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, whose work often explores the intersections of memory and intimacy as agents of sense and future. His award-winning short film, Aquí, an intimate exploration of Puerto Rican political protests as an affective space, has screened at various festivals and institutions across the Americas. As editor and assistant editor, he’s collaborated with ground-breaking Puerto Rican filmmakers such as Ana Paula Teixeira, Javier Colón-Caraballo, and Natalia Lassalle-Morillo. His latest work, “En fin, el Mar”, an experimental, surrealist short film interacting with the sea as both limit & possibility, alienation & belonging, is set to release January 2024.

Sun. Dec. 17 // 3:05p EST

Towards Cinematic Interventions: Workshopping Solutions and Solidarity

Virtual

with NO EVIL EYE CINEMA co-founders, Ruun Nuur and Ingrid Raphaël

RUUN NUUR

Writer, Documentarian

RUUN NUUR is an independent cinematic practitioner and cultural worker hyper focused on Muslim and African narratives. 

Producer of the Field of Vision commissioned documentary short, They Won’t Call It Murder (2022), a poetic exploration of Columbus, Ohio as a container of violence perpetrated by the local police force. The film was selected as a Vimeo Staff Pick and played at Sheffield Doc/Fest, BAMcinemafest, Camden International Film Festival, AFI Festival, DOCNYC and more.

As the co-founder of the nomadic microcinema, NO EVIL EYE CINEMA, Nuur has organized accessible education workshops and original film curation around the country and online. At 22, she created SVLLY(wood), an independent feminist print film magazine, one of the only kinds in the world.

She’s served on the juries of Sheffield Doc/Fest, Indie Memphis and has been an invited guest speaker for Doha Film Institute, True/False Film Festival, New York Film Festival, and many more. 

Her essays and interviews have been published in Film Comment, i-D, DAZED, Hyperallergic and among other multimedia platforms. Her work has been profiled in Interview Magazine, NYLON, Brooklyn Rail, and more. 

Nuur has been awarded as the Fall 2021 Film/Video Studio Resident at Wexner Center for the Arts and currently the 2022 Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship, working on a documentary feature on her homeland of Somalia.

INGRID RAPHAËL

Filmmaker, Artist, Educator, World-Builder

Ingrid Raphaël (they/them) is a multi-disciplinary artist, film director and educator. They draw from their nomadic migrations as an immigrant, a commuter, and daydreamer to weave and situate poetic metaphors between the personal & nature; against the backdrop of mapping spatiality.

They started their film career with personal video essays like movingbodyofwork and An Ode to Cbus, Ohio which screened at CineSpeak, and Anthology Film Archives. They later made their festival debut as the co-director of the Field of Vision commissioned award-winning documentary short, They Won’t Call It Murder (2022), a poetic exploration of Columbus, Ohio as a container of violence perpetrated by the local police force.

They are currently developing a speculative narrative – the project has received support from the Center for the Afrofuturist Studies and the Independence Public Media Foundation.

As the co-founder of the nomadic microcinema, NO EVIL EYE CINEMA (NEEC), Raphaël has organized accessible educational workshops and original film curation around the country and online. They also co-design FILM FUTURA, the decolonial satellite film school which has attracted over 400 students worldwide, and taught the course Afro-futurism on Screen where they continue to carve an intentional research practice of techniques used by Black filmmakers in non-linear modes of storytelling.

They currently teach Experimental Filmmaking at the university-level and Cinematography courses for indie community media enthusiasts and independent workshops through their creative atelier, ATË.

SYMPOSIUM CO-SPONSOR: 

Color Congress

SYMPOSIUM PARTNERS:

BlackStar Film Festival

Palestine Film Institute 

The Center for AfroFuturist Studies

Cinespeak